Spacewalk Complete: First Roll Out New Solar Array Installation

NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Thomas Pesquet concluded their spacewalk at 2:10 p.m. EDT, after 6 hours and 28 minutes. within the eighth spacewalk of the year outside the International space station, the 2 astronauts completed the deployment of a brand new ISS Roll-Out solar panel (iROSA) on the far end of the left (port) side of the station’s backbone truss structure (P6).

Kimbrough and Pesquet successfully unfolded the solar panel, bolted it into place, and connected cables to the station’s power supply to finish deployment. Additionally, the astronauts removed and stowed hardware in preparation for releasing the second iROSA from the flight support structure for installation. The pair will work toward the second solar panel upgrade – this one on the P6 truss’ 4B power channel – during another spacewalk, tentatively scheduled for June 25.

NASA is augmenting six of the eight existing power channels of the space station with new solar arrays to make sure a sufficient power supply is maintained for NASA’s exploration technology demonstrations for Artemis and beyond also as utilization and commercialization.

This was the eighth spacewalk for Kimbrough, the fourth for Pesquet, and therefore the fourth they need conducted together. Kimbrough has now spent a complete of 52 hours and 43 minutes spacewalking, and Pesquet’s total spacewalking time is 26 hours and 15 minutes.

Space station crew members have conducted 240 spacewalks in support of assembly and maintenance of the orbiting laboratory. Spacewalkers have now spent a complete of 63 days and 56 minutes working outside the station.

In November 2020, the International space station surpassed its 20-year milestone of continuous human presence, providing opportunities for unique research and technological demonstrations that help prepare for long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars and also improve life on Earth. in this time, 244 people from 19 countries have visited the orbiting laboratory that has hosted nearly 3,000 research investigations from researchers in 108 countries and areas.

Learn More About Space station Astronaut(Shane Kimbrough &Thomas Pesquet)…

NASA Astronaut Robert Shane Kimbrough

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CREDIT: NASA Astronaut Robert Shane Kimbrough

R. Shane Kimbrough was selected by NASA in 2004.  He completed his first spaceflight in 2008 on STS-126, where he spent almost 16 days on the mission to expand the crew living quarters to accommodate a six-member crew.  During the mission, he performed two spacewalks.  Kimbrough earned a Master of Science degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology.  Before being selected as an astronaut, Kimbrough joined NASA in 2000 as a Flight Simulation Engineer (FSE) on the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA).  Kimbrough flew on the Expedition 49/50 mission where he performed 4 spacewalks and has now logged in a total of 189 days in space.

ESA Astronaut Thomas Pesquet

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CREDIT: ESA Astronaut Thomas Pesquet

April to September 2001, Thomas was a trainee engineer with Thales Alenia Space in Cannes, France, where he developed a satellite system design tool using concurrent engineering techniques.

From October 2001, he worked as a spacecraft dynamics engineer on remote sensing missions for GMV S.A. in Madrid, Spain.

Between 2002 and 2004, Thomas worked at the French space agency, CNES, as a search engineer on space mission autonomy. He also administered studies on future European ground segment design and European space technology harmonisation. From late 2002, he was a CNES representative at the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems, performing on cross-support between international space agencies.

An avid private pilot in his spare time, Thomas was selected in 2004 for Air France’s flight training programme. He went on to become a commercial pilot for the airline, where he started flying the Airbus A320 in 2006. Having logged over 2300 flight hours on commercial airliners, he became a kind rating instructor on the A320 and a Crew Resource Management instructor.

Thomas was selected as an ESA astronaut in May 2009. He joined ESA in September 2009 and completed basic training in November 2010. After graduation, he worked as a Eurocom, communicating with astronauts during spaceflights from the mission control centre. He was also responsible of future projects at the european(ESA) Astronaut Centre, including initiating cooperation with new partners like China.

To be ready for a space mission, he received further technical and operational training in Europe, Russia and therefore the USA: on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, on the US and Russian spacesuits, and on space station(ISS) systems. He took part in exploration training courses: living and dealing underground on ESA’s CAVES training course in 2011, and underwater on NASA’s Seatest-2 mission.

On 17 March 2014, Thomas was assigned to a long-duration mission on the International space station(ISS).